Local Rules

Notice of Adoption of Local Rule Amendments, Effective July 16, 2020

Pursuant to General Order 20-010, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Rhode Island has adopted amendments to two of its local rules:  LBR 2002-1 and 5001-2.  See the Notice of Adoption and links to the red-lined and clean versions of these most recent changes. This information is also maintained in the Table of Prior Local Rule and Form Changes by Date page on our website, and are contained in our electronic Local Rule Book

General Order 20-008 entered April 21, 2020 Amending Interim Bankruptcy Rule 1020 to Implement Provisions of the CARES Act

The Court has entered General Order 20-008 amending Interim Bankruptcy Rule 1020 to  implement the provisions of the CARES Act related to eligibility to be a small business debtor under subchapter V of Chapter 11, which increased the maximum “aggregate noncontingent liquidated secured and unsecured debts” of the debtor from $2,725,625 to $7,500,000. This new maximum does not apply to cases filed prior to the enactment of the CARES Act, and is effective for one year from the effective date of the CARES Act, March 27, 2020. See 11 U.S.C. § 1182(1)(A).

Notice of Adoption of Interim Bankruptcy Rules and Local Rules and Forms to Implement SBRA, Effective February 19, 2020

Pursuant to General Order 20-001, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Rhode Island has adopted, as Interim Local Rules, the interim bankruptcy rules approved by the Advisory Committee on Bankruptcy Rules, and amended Local Rules and Forms to implement the Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019, effective February 19, 2020.

See attached Notice of Adoption and links to the red-lined and clean versions of these most recent changes. 

Training materials outlining the rule and form changes are now available on the "For Attorney" page under Attorney Resources/Training

 

 

 

 

Local Rules

The Local Bankruptcy Rules (LBRs) are a set of procedures and mandatory requirements for bankruptcy cases and proceedings in the District of Rhode Island. LBRs also give parties and their attorneys instructions for getting their requests in front of the judge and list requirements for attorneys, trustees, and other parties who work for a bankruptcy estate. Motions are often denied because parties do not follow LBRs, so it is important to familiarize yourself with the LBRs that are relevant to your case.